honour your cycle,
honour yourself.
 
Receive your free pass to my cycle guides, rituals, meditations and playlists, plus receive moontime news support from me
choose extra news + invites:
You’ve successfully signed up! Check your email for details.

monthly cycle wisdom circles: join our wild flow coven membership

Preparing and Celebrating Puberty and Periods with your Child

How to support your children through puberty and menarche by Charlotte Pointeaux

How do you help your daughter love her period? You’ve been learning about your menstrual cycle and how to attune to its changing daily strengths, vulnerabilities, and self-care needs – and it’s been life changing to finally learn what you should have learnt as a child. So imagine how powerful it would be for our children to learn this knowledge and wisdom now – rather than having to figure it all out after many years of being disconnected to their body, their cycle and therefore, themselves. If you’d love to share what you now know with your child or any other child for that matter but aren’t sure of when or how to start, I’d love to give you some ideas to help you do that confidently in a way that feels gentle, age-appropriate, and empowering for you and your child.

Many mothers have traditionally thought that children aren’t ready to learn about their body, how it changes, what menstruation is, or anything else associated with puberty until they have their first period but when we leave “the talk” until this time, children already have a lot of feelings, thoughts and confusion about what’s been happening to their body and sense of selves for a while, and they question what these changes mean about them if they are left in the dark.

Children in the playground talk and share information that’s usually incomplete or inaccurate, leaving children to piece the story together themselves. Schools deliver education that’s most often squashed down in one or two hours total to combine information on what periods are and how to manage blood, anatomy and how reproduction works which sends children the message that having periods means that falling pregnant is something to fear, and that when they begin their periods, they’re ready to have sex, which is not the case at all from a developmental point of view.

When talking about periods is so uncomfortable, it continues the menstrual taboo that we have been victims of for millennia. So how do we cultivate a period positive culture?

Intuition: When to Say No and Love Yourself First

Did you know that on average, Australian females experience between 450-500 periods in her lifetime, with the average cycle spanning between 21-35 days, and the average bleed lasting between 2-7 days?

Once we begin menstruating (at menarche – pronounced “men-ar-kee”) which occurs anywhere these days between roughly the ages of 8-15, and commonly around ages 12-13, we begin our monthly bleed (menstrual cycle) until we reach menopause which occurs approximately at the age of 50 (although again, this can occur much earlier or later as it is do individual).

After menarche our periods will be irregular for most of our teen years until the rhythm is established and our hormones settle into their natural, beautiful cycle. You might notice that some months you bleed for longer, or more heavily than other times, or that your cycle isn’t the same length each time. This is all ok – everyone’s cycle is different.

Why You Should Track Your Menstrual Cycle And How To Do It

why you should track your Menstrual cycle and how to do it

Did you know that on average, Australian females experience between 450-500 periods in her lifetime, with the average cycle spanning between 21-35 days, and the average bleed lasting between 2-7 days?

Once we begin menstruating (at menarche – pronounced “men-ar-kee”) which occurs anywhere these days between roughly the ages of 8-15, and commonly around ages 12-13, we begin our monthly bleed (menstrual cycle) until we reach menopause which occurs approximately at the age of 50 (although again, this can occur much earlier or later as it is do individual).

After menarche our periods will be irregular for most of our teen years until the rhythm is established and our hormones settle into their natural, beautiful cycle. You might notice that some months you bleed for longer, or more heavily than other times, or that your cycle isn’t the same length each time. This is all ok – everyone’s cycle is different.

period power: why you should care about your period​

period power: why you should care about your period​ – wild flow podcast with Charlotte Pointeaux. This week on Wild Flow Podcast…

Understanding exactly what is going on within our bodies as cyclical beings is incredibly profound – in fact it’s life altering, and potentially culturally transformational. When the majority of girls grow up feeling very disconnected from their bodies and reject their menstrual cycles, as they are overwhelmed by cultural and familial menstrual shame, the effects of this play out in a multitude of ways across all realms of our lives. So by learning what your period is, and what your menstrual cycle is as a whole, and intentionally supporting and seeking support during our rites of passages is a sacred reclamation.

4 Ways to Boost Confidence in Girls

Did you know that on average, Australian females experience between 450-500 periods in her lifetime, with the average cycle spanning between 21-35 days, and the average bleed lasting between 2-7 days?

Once we begin menstruating (at menarche – pronounced “men-ar-kee”) which occurs anywhere these days between roughly the ages of 8-15, and commonly around ages 12-13, we begin our monthly bleed (menstrual cycle) until we reach menopause which occurs approximately at the age of 50 (although again, this can occur much earlier or later as it is do individual).

After menarche our periods will be irregular for most of our teen years until the rhythm is established and our hormones settle into their natural, beautiful cycle. You might notice that some months you bleed for longer, or more heavily than other times, or that your cycle isn’t the same length each time. This is all ok – everyone’s cycle is different.

What age is best for girls to attend a First Moon Circle?

Did you know that on average, Australian females experience between 450-500 periods in her lifetime, with the average cycle spanning between 21-35 days, and the average bleed lasting between 2-7 days?

Once we begin menstruating (at menarche – pronounced “men-ar-kee”) which occurs anywhere these days between roughly the ages of 8-15, and commonly around ages 12-13, we begin our monthly bleed (menstrual cycle) until we reach menopause which occurs approximately at the age of 50 (although again, this can occur much earlier or later as it is do individual).

After menarche our periods will be irregular for most of our teen years until the rhythm is established and our hormones settle into their natural, beautiful cycle. You might notice that some months you bleed for longer, or more heavily than other times, or that your cycle isn’t the same length each time. This is all ok – everyone’s cycle is different.

When Burn-out Bites, Stop and Smell the Roses

When Burn-out Bites, Stop and Smell the Roses. I’ve come to the end of a major cycle in my business after wrapping up my First Moon Circle Facilitator Training, 3 months with a 1:1 client, and holding what might be the last circle for the year – all within 3 days of each other.And instead of feeling elated, on top of the world, so incredibly proud and CELEBRATING the hell out of it all, I’m finding myself in forced isolation at home due to COVID, experiencing broken websites and now a broken phone, feeling flat and frustrated. You see, I’ve been journalling today and unravelling why I’ve been finding it so hard to celebrate my amazing achievements. I’ve received the most amazing feedback from the facilitators and I seriously couldn’t be more delighted with how its all gone. BUT I’m feeling myself stuck in that lull phase between projects.

Remembering You Are The Moon! The Missing Link to Thriving In A Man’s World

Hormones get a bad rap by anyone who doesn’t understand their cyclic power, the role they play in creation and creativity, and anyone who finds them inconvenient, which includes many women and girls, as well as males.However hormones are such a gift! As female hormones change across the cycle, day to day, week to week, we see a beautiful rhythm emerge that really clearly mirrors the moons phases and nature’s seasons. These layers of cycles (menstrual, moon, sun, and seasons) show us how we are meant to live: in a way that honours the cycle and our humanity. We aren’t robots. We are moons. So let’s live as we are meant to.These cycles show us how to get the best out of ourselves if we can listen.

Beat Sunday dread: 5 Family Rituals For a Smooth Week

Did you know that on average, Australian females experience between 450-500 periods in her lifetime, with the average cycle spanning between 21-35 days, and the average bleed lasting between 2-7 days?

Once we begin menstruating (at menarche – pronounced “men-ar-kee”) which occurs anywhere these days between roughly the ages of 8-15, and commonly around ages 12-13, we begin our monthly bleed (menstrual cycle) until we reach menopause which occurs approximately at the age of 50 (although again, this can occur much earlier or later as it is do individual).

After menarche our periods will be irregular for most of our teen years until the rhythm is established and our hormones settle into their natural, beautiful cycle. You might notice that some months you bleed for longer, or more heavily than other times, or that your cycle isn’t the same length each time. This is all ok – everyone’s cycle is different.